What Does the Bible Say About the Trinity?

What Does the Bible Say About the Trinity?

When all the people were baptized, it came to pass that Jesus also was baptized; and while He prayed, the heaven was opened. 22 And the Holy Spirit descended in bodily form like a dove upon Him, and a voice came from heaven which said, “You are My beloved Son; in You I am well pleased.”  (Lk 3:21-22)

This verse is an indication that there are three persons in the deity—called the Triune God (or the Trinity).  Triune simply means “three in one.”  This is certainly a theological mystery and something that is beyond our human comprehension.  The three persons of the Godhead are eternal, and have always existed together in loving unity.  This is one of several mysteries of faith that followers of Jesus are not able to comprehend now, but will understand fully in eternity.

When Jesus was baptized, the three persons of the Godhead were present.  The Father spoke from Heaven; the Son fulfilled all righteousness in being baptized; and the Spirit descended upon Jesus as a dove.  (Mt 3:16-17)

There are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. There are differences of ministries, but the same Lord. And there are diversities of activities, but it is the same God who works all in all.  (1 Cor 12:4-6)  This verse above speaks about: 1) the Spirit, 2) the Lord [Jesus]; and 3) God [the Father]. 

. . . and declared to be the Son of God with power according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.  (Rom 1:4)   This verse confirms that Jesus was the Son of God [the Father], who was raised from the dead by the power of the Holy Spirit.  (see Rom 8:11)  So this is another indication of a Triune God.

Another verse that speaks to our topic is:

. . . remembering without ceasing your work of faith, labor of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ in the sight of our God and Father, knowing, beloved brethren, your election by God. For our gospel did not come to you in word only, but also in power, and in the Holy Spirit and in much assurance, as you know what kind of men we were among you for your sake.  (1 Thes 1:3-5)

We are people of faith, and the doctrine of the Trinity is a matter of faith.  It was confirmed as official church doctrine in AD325 at the Council of Nicea.  As is true of so many facets of our faith, we know that one day the Lord will open our eyes to all truth when we are with Him, face to face.  God bless you.

What You Behold

What You Behold

Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things.  (Phil 4:8 NKJV)

This passage of Scripture is talking about meditation upon positive topics and positive traits.  Why does the Lord want us to think about these things?  One of the main reasons is that our lives do reflect whatever we value and whatever we think about. 

The more that we value and think about passages from the Bible, then the more that our lives will reflect the values of the Bible.  The more that we value our relationship with Jesus and the more often that we think about Jesus’ qualities, the more that we will reflect His beautiful qualities in our own lives.

 Now the Lord is the Spirit; and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. 18 But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord.  (2 Cor 3:17-18 NKJV)

This passage, above, in 2 Corinthians confirms that what we behold [view, consider, regard] will actually transform us!  Hallelujah!

Daily Bible reading is such a wonderful practice to cultivate because it will show us God’s “Good Life” which He has in store for each and every one of us.  All that we are required to do in order to receive it is to think about it regularly and to value it highly; because we become whatever we behold.

God has created us to be miraculous beings who are transformed by the things upon which we focus, and which we value. 

Love Edifies

Love Edifies

Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.  (1 Cor 8:1c AKJV)

But knowledge puffs up while love builds up.  (1 Cor 8:1c NIV)

The portion of Scripture shown above clearly reminds us that love edifies, or builds up the body of Christ.  What does this mean?

It’s our responsibility, as believers, to build up our brothers and sisters in Christ by how we live our lives and by what we teach.  (See Eph 4:11-16) 

 How is it then, brethren? Whenever you come together, each of you has a psalm, has a teaching, has a tongue, has a revelation, has an interpretation. Let all things be done for edification.  (1 Cor 14:26 NKJV) 

The passage above reminds us that what we do and teach during an assembly or a church meeting should all be geared toward the spiritual growth and maturing of those who attend the gathering.  It gives us suggestions on what to do in order to build people up.  Our teaching, singing, and moving in the operation of the gifts of the Spirit will build up the body of Christ.  

In every situation, the Word of God is the foundation for spiritual growth.  But rather than allowing our knowledge of the Word to move us toward pride, we must be continually anchored by God’s love for mankind and by His love for each one of us. 

The Lord is not willing that any should perish (2 Pet 3:9).  His unconditional love living in our hearts will keep us stable and secure as we grow in wisdom and knowledge. 

. . . that their hearts may be encouraged, being knit together in love, and attaining to all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the knowledge of the mystery of God, both of the Father and of Christ, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.  (Col 2:2-3 NKJV)

In Christ, we have received untold treasures!

Being a Witness Where You Are

Being a Witness Where You Are

And He said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.”  (Mk 16:15)

Declare His glory among the nations, His wonders among all peoples.  (Ps 96:3)

And this gospel of the kingdom will be preached in all the world as a witness to all the nations, and then the end will come.  (Mt 24:14)

The Bible tells us in 2 Peter 3:9 that the Lord is not willing that any should perish.  Jesus obediently fulfilled His assignment to the fullest, and has purchased our salvation.  We are instructed by the Scriptures to share our Good News with others! 

We don’t need to embark on a mission field in some far-flung country to do this.  We’re called to be witnesses of God’s goodness right where we are!  We may do that in a variety of ways:  by serving our neighbors through acts of kindness and mercy; by being helpful and considerate; by sending a card, making a meal, or visiting someone who is not feeling well.  God has made us to be creative, and every individual can think of creative ways to be a light in this world—thereby bringing glory to God.

Sharing the Good News isn’t about preaching at someone or beating them over the head with verses from the Bible.  It’s not about condemnation, but love.  It’s about lovingly reaching out to those we know, and interacting with them in ways that are meaningful to them.  And while we’re doing that, we take opportunities to share our own life experiences with them.  We may quote a succinct Scripture to support a comment, or share a brief testimony of answered prayer.

Being an effective witness for the Kingdom of God means connecting with our friends and neighbors during good and bad times. (Eccl 3:4)  As a witness, we should also strive to be a good citizen and neighbor—a good example.  (2 Cor 5:20)  We need to speak from our hearts, and show respect and sympathy towards others.

Witnessing means being genuine with our friends and neighbors, and even admitting when we may be struggling with something.  (2 Tim 1:8)  As we are open with others and allow them to see God resolve our circumstances for us, our life becomes a window into how the Kingdom of God operates.  This style of candid testimony affirms our authenticity.  Other people can sense how deeply we honor Christ and value our relationship with Him as they see us trust Him to work out the difficulties that we encounter in life.  (1 Pet 3:15)

As we live this way, the Lord will faithfully open the ears, minds, and hearts of those with whom we interact.  He will allow others to hear the voice of the Good Shepherd, and His Spirit will then be able to move upon them to minister to them. 

All we need to understand is that the Lord will draw the unsaved to Himself through us—if we’ll cooperate with Him.  Praise God!

We’re One with the Lord

We’re One with the Lord

But he who is joined to the Lord is one spirit with Him.  (1 Cor 6:17)

. . . as He is, so are we in this world.  (1 Joh 4:17b)

When we become born again (saved), one of those mysteries occurs that the Bible mentions. “What mystery?” you ask.  The mystery of our spirit being joined to the spirit of Christ.  The mystery that the Bible reveals in 1 John 4:17 that as Jesus is—right now in heaven—so are we (believers) on earth.

How is that possible?  That is why it is called a mystery, because we will understand it fully when we are in heaven, face to face with the Lord.  Until that day, we trust in this verse by using the gift of faith that He gave to each one of us.

Because we are one spirit with the Lord, we have intimate communion with God through Christ.  Our salvation experience has baptized us into Christ.  We have “put on Christ.”  (Gal 3:27) 

Being “in Christ” allows us to experience this new life that we’ve been given in community with all those who are also in Christ.  We have fellowship as well as unity.

To my thinking, Jesus, Himself, is the robe of righteousness to which Job 29:14 and Isaiah 61:10 refer.  (Rom 8:1; Gal 2:16)

Daily Bible reading will keep us attached to the True Vine.  (Joh 15:1-11)  The more the word of Christ dwells in us richly, the more fully the joy of Christ will dwell within us.

As you ponder this mystery of being joined to the Lord, take time to thank and to praise God for it.  Allow yourself to celebrate and to enjoy the sense of awe and wonder that this living mystery deserves.

We Are Servants

We Are Servants

Let a man so consider us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God.  Moreover, it is required in stewards that one be found faithful.  (! Cor 4:1-2)

James, a bondservant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, to the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad . . .  (Jas 1:1)

“These men are the servants of the Most High God, who proclaim to us the way of salvation.”  (Act 16:17)

. . . just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”  (Mt 20:28)

As shown in Matthew chapter 20, Jesus came to serve humanity—He came as a servant.  Jesus came to reconcile mankind to His loving Father, and how thankful we are for His completed work. 

The Bible tells us that Jesus is our example.  (1 Pet 2:21)  Since He lived to serve humanity (which means people), so also should we!   Let’s admit that God saved us to empower us to serve others. 

How may we serve other people in meaningful ways which bring glory to God?

  • Hold onto and teach others sound doctrine. (Tit 1:9; 2:1)
  • Perform good works/deeds for other people so that people will give glory to God for them. (Mt 5:16; Eph 2:10)
  • Be LIGHT in the world. (Mt 5:14)  Jesus says in John 8:12 that He is the light of the world.  As believers, we are to allow the light of Christ within us to shine forth to all.
  • Live honorably. (1 Pet 2:12)
  • Be faithful. (Mt 25:23)
  • Use your gifts, skills, and passions to serve within the body of Christ. (Rom 12:4-6; 1 Cor 12:27-28)

Living our lives as an offering and a sacrifice to the Lord—in service to others—is not only honorable; it is very satisfying.  God bless you.

Not Perfection but Maturity

Not Perfection but Maturity

Therefore, leaving the discussion of the elementary principles of Christ, let us go on to perfection, not laying again the foundation of repentance from dead works and of faith toward God . . .   (Heb 6:1)

What does the author of Hebrews 6 want us to understand by the word “perfection” as used in this verse?  The Jamieson, Fausset & Brown (JFB) Commentary on Hebrews 6 says this about it: 

perfection–the matured knowledge of those who are “of full age” ( Heb 5:14 ) in Christian attainments.

In the JFB commentary, “full age” can be understood to mean mature.  Once a person is mature in Christian attainments, what does their life look like to others? 

  • This person is not easily swayed by false or erroneous doctrines; but it’s someone who ministers God’s love and mercy to others. (Eph 4:13-16)
  • Their relationship with the Lord remains steadfast, regardless of the current circumstances of their life. (Col 1:23)
  • A mature Christian doesn’t get anxious over things that they can’t control—especially about events reported in the news. (Ps 112:7)
  • He or she will not allow any circumstance of life to disrupt their faith in God nor their daily spiritual habits of quiet time with the Lord, prayer, and Bible reading. (Act 2:42)
  • They maintain their childlike sense of wonder and trust in God. (Mt 18:3)
  • A mature Christian does not compare themselves with others. (2 Cor 10:12)
  • This is a person who is rooted and grounded in love—the love of God for them and the love of God for other people. (Eph 3:17)

The verse at the top of this article (Heb 6:1) reminds each of us that the Lord doesn’t want us to remain stationary in our Christian walk but that we need to build upon the foundational principles of our faith and to grow in maturity in Christ Jesus.